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Resting in the Hope and Assurances of God

Text: Psalm 119:49-50
Speaker: Taylor Bassett
Date: February 28, 2016

An evening sermon from Taylor Bassett.


Sister, Sister

Text: Luke 10:38-42
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: February 28, 2016

We have come to another famous story which only occurs in Luke’s gospel.  Mary and Martha have often been used as representative of two personality types – the responsible task oriented Martha who serves versus the contemplative Mary who listens.  There is, however, much more to their story than these stereotypes.

Many of us will see ourselves in this account, especially in Martha.  Many church leaders admit to having some of Martha’s faults.  John MacArthur writes, “It is very easy for me to identify with Martha… It is tempting at times to become swept away in the activity of ministry and forget that faith and worship must always have priority over work.  In our sometimes hectic lives we all need to cultivate more of Mary’s worshipful, listening spirit and less of Martha’s scrambling commotion.”  Spurgeon also admits, “The preacher will have one hearer tonight to whom his text will be amazingly applicable – namely, himself.  Here we have meeting after meeting, and engagement after engagement.”

Most of us, at times, can be guilty of allowing lesser things to trouble us thus distracting us from the one thing that matters most.  We know that our priorities are distorted when we find ourselves falling into Martha’s sins of being anxious, envious and angry.  We think that our problems are caused by other people, but actually our need is to sit at the feet of Jesus.

Please ready Luke 10:38-42 before listening to this sermon.


The Vanity of Human Wisdom: Part II

Text: Ecclesiastes 1:12-18
Speaker: Mike Kelley
Date: February 21, 2016

An evening service sermon from Mike Kelley.


The Compassionate Samaritan

Text: Luke 10:29-37
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: February 21, 2016

It is my habit to walk to church on Sunday mornings.  I leave my home at precisely 8:15 AM so that I can join my fellow elders for prayer at 8:30 AM.  I don’t want to be later.  Several months ago, as I was about to arrive at church I saw Mr. Onan (a gentleman in his 90s who recently passed away) standing outside of his house looking confused.  I assumed that he was waiting for the person who is supposed to walk him over to the church to arrive, but no-one would come for at least 15 minutes.  What was I to do?  If I were to help Mr. Onan get to church I would be late to the elder prayer time.  Today’s passage came to mind.

In this section of Luke 10 Jesus is being questioned (and tested) by an expert in the Jewish Law who asks what he must do to inherit eternal life.  Jesus initially answers the lawyer’s question with a question, “What does the Law say?”  The lawyer answers correctly that the Law is summarized by love for God and love for neighbor.  What the expert in the Law doesn’t understand is that he (and the rest of us) can’t measure up to God’s standard.  His blindness is reflected in his follow-up question in which he seeks to justify himself, “Who is my neighbor?”  Jesus defines neighbor in a way which addresses the prejudices of the lawyer and the other leaders among the Jews, and exposes his sin.

In this sermon we will explain the parable and we will show how the parable applies to each of the three uses of God’s Law.  Do you remember what they are?  If not, look in the attached notes.

Finally, we shall see how Jesus alone exemplifies in reality the qualities of the Good Samaritan.  He has rescued us at great cost to Himself.

Please read Luke 10:25-37 before listening to this sermon.


The Vanity of Human Wisdom: Part I

Text: Ecclesiastes 1:12-18
Speaker: Mike Kelley
Date: February 14, 2016

An evening service sermon from Mike Kelley.


A Question About Love

Text: Luke 10:25-29
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: February 14, 2016

This Sunday, February 14, love will be in the air as the world celebrates Valentine’s Day.  In God’s providence we have come to the section in Luke which defines Who we should love the most and how we should love Him.  The greatest of all commandments is to love God.  We are also exhorted to love one another as the second greatest commandment.

This passage has been misunderstood by many people.   Some people try to use our passage to teach the importance of self-love.  A careful study of the text will show that there is no imperative/command to love yourself.  Some, including the expert in the Jewish Law in our text, think that it is somehow possible for us to love God and neighbor well enough to justify ourselves.  Others rightly point out that the impossibility of meeting this standard should drive us to seek God’s grace which comes to us through Christ.  But some of these then make the error of neglecting the command to love by saying that all that matters is that Jesus fulfilled these commandments for us.  We love because He first loved us. 1 John 4:19

Please read Luke 10:25-37 before listening to this sermon.


The Temporary Nature of All Things

Text: Ecclesiastes 1:1-11
Speaker: Mike Kelley
Date: February 7, 2016

An evening service sermon from Mike Kelley.


Kingdom Joy

Text: Luke 10:17-24
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: February 7, 2016

What brings you the greatest joy.  Some of us have wonderful memories of weddings and the birth of their children.  Others, like the seventy harvesters Jesus had sent out, rejoice when God has worked powerfully through them.  Yet Jesus says there is an even greater cause for joy than this.

Jesus Himself also expresses great joy – which is surprisingly uncommon in the gospels which primarily portray Him as a man of sorrows.  What would cause Jesus to rejoice greatly?

Some of us are prone to sadness or depression.  Many are going through hard trials which threaten to sap our joy.  How can we maintain and grow our joy in spite of the hardships of this life?

I believe that this week’s text will answer these questions and help us to understand how we can experience the joy of Jesus’ kingdom.

Please read Luke 10:1-24 before listening to this sermon.


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