Featured Audio

Happy Endings

Text: Ruth 4:13-22
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: October 27, 2013

My wife likes happy endings.  Because of this we have watched a lot of old movies and she has a lifetime subscription to “The Reader’s Digest” (those of you who are younger can google it to get the idea).  Many recent books and movies have tragic or meaningless conclusions which reflect the post-Christian worldview that life is a matter of chance and that we are on our own.  Christians stand out as people who believe in happy endings.  God is working in the events of our life for our good and for His glory (Romans 8:28).  Even when life is hard we look forward to the ultimate happy ending when Christ shall return (Romans 8:18 Philippians 3:20-21  1 John 3:1-3).

The book of Ruth ends with multiple happy endings.  Boaz has a godly wife, fit for a king.  Ruth the Moabites is an admired matriarch in Israel.  Naomi holds the baby who brings redemption to her and her family.  The author then concludes by showing that the blessing of God through this seemingly ordinary family extends to His purpose to, through their descendant David, redeem Israel from the terrible plight she experienced in the days of the Judges (which resembles the sad situation of Naomi in the first chapter).  This then moves to the final conclusion as we look ahead to the Son of David Who would come to redeem the world.

The book of Ruth is a great story of God’s extraordinary providence in the lives of ordinary people.  When we are tempted to wonder whether God cares (“Where is my happy ending?”), we should remember His past faithfulness to His people and His faithfulness to us in Christ.


Mark 1:12-13

Text: Mark 1:12-13
Speaker: Brian Onstead
Date: October 20, 2013

An evening service sermon from Brian Onstead.


Redemption and Romance

Text: Ruth 4:1-12
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: October 20, 2013

The Bible is not merely a collection of stories to inspire us to live successful lives.  The stories of the Bible, including that of Ruth, reveal the character and the works of God.  While the book of Ruth has a romantic element, it is not merely another Disney or Jane Austen story. What is remarkable about the romance in Ruth is that both the male and female leads love God more than they love each other.  They are married as an expression of their loyal service to Him.  Such a marriage actually produces greater happiness and honor than the self-serving marriages which are so much more typical.

The selfless lovingkindess of Boaz and Ruth is contrasted with others (a nameless kinsman and Orpah) who pursue self-interest, but wind up being forgotten.

Boaz as the faithful kinsman-redeemer is a picture of Jesus our Kinsman-Redeemer Who acted selflessly to deliver us at great cost.


Mark 4:35-41

Text: Mark 4:35-41
Speaker: Nick Kalena
Date: October 13, 2013

An evening service sermon from Nick Kalena.


A Daring Proposal

Text: Ruth 3
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: October 13, 2013

This Sunday we will continue our exposition of the book of Ruth.  Chapter three is one of the most easily misunderstood chapters in the Bible.  A young woman sneaks to the place where the man she wants to marry is sleeping and lies down at his feet.  Of course, if Ruth, Boaz and Naomi would hear of the dating customs which would take place over 3000 years later in our culture they would have been shocked as well.

The book of Ruth is about redemption more than romance.  God’s redemption of His people is portrayed by the redemption experienced by Naomi and Ruth.  We will also see some broad principles for how to approach finding a mate (while not imitating what Ruth did!).

You will notice that it is similar to Ruth 2, portraying a significant day in Ruth’s life which begins with her at home with Naomi making plans (to be fed, then to be wed), then Ruth goes out to carry out the plan, and finally Ruth returns home full to report back to Naomi about the lovingkindness of Boaz.


The Great Exchange

Text: 2 Corinthians 5:21
Speaker: Mike Kelley
Date: October 6, 2013

In this text we examine the incredible realities of what theologians call the double imputation:  Christ takes upon his Person our sin and is punished in our place; we take upon our person His perfect righteousness and are treated as such by God.  The benefits of this incredible exchange are profound and not fully possible for us to comprehend.  Indeed, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is the Good News!


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