Featured Audio

The Commission and Hope of the Summoned

Text: 1 Peter 3:8-9
Speaker: Greg Enright
Date: November 25,2012

An evening service sermon from Greg Enright.


Who’s Your Momma?

Text: Galatians 4:21-31
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: November 25, 2012

Many major world religions look to Abraham as their father. The big difference is over who is their mother. There has been much in the news about this in recent days as those who are descended from Abraham’s son Ishmael whose mother was Hagar (most of whom are Muslims) are at war with some of those who are descended from Abraham’s son Isaac (Israel) who was born to Sarah.

In spite of the claims of Muslims that Ishmael is the favored son, Isaac was the true heir of God’s earthly promises to Abraham (Genesis 17). Paul uses the history of the earthly sons of Abraham to illustrate the difference between Abraham’s spiritual sons. The Jews and their followers (who are of the present Jerusalem) who seek to earn their salvation by law keeping are like Ishmael the son of Hagar who was born of fleshly effort.   On the other hand, those who believe are born supernaturally of the Spirit and are, like Isaac, the true sons of Abraham (and citizens of the heavenly Jerusalem). Who is your mother (Momma)? Sarah or Hagar?

Many commentators regard this as the hardest passage in Galatians because of its use of the Old Testament (both from Genesis and Isaiah 54) and because of Paul’s complicated argument using the sons of Abraham to illustrate spiritual truth. I am confident that you will, with careful attention, understand this powerful and profitable gospel-proclaiming passage.


The God Who Plays Favorites

Text: Genesis 37
Speaker: Mike Seufert
Date: November 18, 2012

An evening service sermon from Mike Seufert.


Christ Formed in You

Text: Galatians 4:12-20
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: November 18, 2012

The Apostle Paul is beside himself with grief over the defection of the Galatians.  He has defended the gospel using Scripture and sounds theological arguments.  In today’s passage Paul makes it personal.  He is absolutely astonished that they would allow themselves to be seduced by false teachers who would rob them of their freedom and joy.  He contrasts the motives of the false teachers, who seek followers for themselves, with his own – simply that they grow in Christlikeness.

False teachers today are seeking followers for themselves by drawing people away from the gospel.  We must not only be prepared to defend the gospel, but also, like Paul, we must care deeply as we seek to point people back to Christ.


Don’t Go Back

Text: Galatians 4:8-11
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: November 11, 2012

In 1973 American POWs who had been held in North Vietnam were released.  Many were initially brought to the Philippines where they were offered the meal of their choice.

Imagine if one of the former prisoners were to say, “I miss the handful of rice infested with maggots on which I have lived for the past four years. I want to go back to Hanoi.”  One would wonder if they had gone crazy!

When Paul sees the Galatians wanting to go back to the slavery of the Law after having been set free by the gospel, he also is deeply troubled.  Did he rescue them in vain?

This Sunday we will look at Galatians 4:8-11 in which they are reminded of how they were redeemed from their former slavery as they came to know God.

People today also prefer the slavery of seeking to justify themselves by Law and morality.  The church today needs the same warnings Paul gave to the Galatians.


Citizenship in Your Home Away from Home

Text: Jeremiah 29:1-14
Speaker: Jim Newheiser
Outline: PDF
Date: November 4, 2012

This Sunday we will take a break from Galatians to consider what Scripture teaches about our responsibilities as believers to live as good citizens in the nations which are our temporary home away from our true heavenly home.  We will focus our attention on Jeremiah 29 which contains a letter from the prophet to the Jewish exiles in Babylon.   Jeremiah tells them to carry on their lives and to seek the prosperity (shalom) of the city in which they live as they await restoration to the promised land (in 70 years).  Our situation is similar to that of the exiles in Babylon.  Our true citizenship is in heaven as we live as strangers and aliens in our earthly nations.  Rather than completely withdrawing from culture (as some Christians have done) we should carry on with life and seek to be a blessing to our nations.

How can we bring blessing to our nation?  What does the Bible teach about our relationship to human government?  How does our faith impact how we exercise our citizenship (including our vote)?


Jonathan, the Unsung Hero

Text: 1 Samuel 14:1-15
Speaker: Colin Jones
Date: November 4, 2012

An evening service sermon from Colin Jones.


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